Fear, Your Worst Enemy or Best Friend?

Fear, Your Worst Enemy or Best Friend?

Many years ago, fear was an emotion needed to navigate life’s adventures. Especially when we used to hunt for prey up close and personal, armed only with a big stick. Our true comrade during these situations—the adrenal glands—released life-saving hormones that would caution us when exceptionally dangerous circumstances arose. In modern times and in a world where we now have the convenience of grocery stores, this dependence on fear has become enemy number one.

photo3The adrenal glands house primary hormones that release little messengers into your body when you need to run like hell, dodge a bullet, etc. These literally life-saving glands sit on top of the kidneys and produce the following essential hormones: epinephrine, norepinephrine, and cortisol.

In the United States, the increasing incidence of adrenal fatigue is puzzling, in part due to our current non-threating life style. Most of us don’t need to search for nourishment, or worry about securing a partner to procreate in order to maintain the family farm. So the big question becomes: why are we so stressed and paralyzed by fear?

Maybe we’re addicted to the adrenalin rush of fright? Certainly the average American’s taste in television and movies would suggest so.

Or perhaps we’re too comfortable, unwilling to make a healthy change when our wise inner voice provides direction? Could avoidance build stress in the body and ultimately lead to the over production of epinephrine?

Personally I feel the main culprit is the mind, and its out of control fearful thinking—mostly worse case scenarios that rarely manifest.

Whatever the reason, the adrenal glands have received a memo that modern day life is dangerous and consequently, caused debilitating immune disorders and sky rocketing obesity. For example, cortisol, a hormone also released from the adrenal glands, tells the body to hold onto fat.

The perpetual process of fear holds us back from our greatest talents and personal evolution. Most spiritualists believe fear is simply an illusion, and what we truly fear most is happiness, success, and wellness.

A few hours after my first daughter was born, I recognized that anxiety and dread had replaced exhaustion and the euphoric feelings following my healthy birth. My mind quickly began to fret about her every need. Did the nurses turn her on her side when they returned her to the nursery? Did she get enough breast milk during her last feeding? Is she crying right now? The worry took over my whole body and prevented me form enjoying my family visiting and witnessing our family growing with the birth of its first grandchild. I could no longer smell the beautiful flowers filling my hospital room or feel the presence of my sister who traveled from Seattle to be at my side in Klamath Falls, Oregon. I was completely distracted. Not with joy and gratitude, but with horror that something was going to go terribly wrong with this new life I had prayed for.

A few months later, battling lethargy from sleep deprivation, coupled with the constant worry of my first child’s health and wellbeing, I sat down and begged the universe to help me enjoy my life and the new beautiful being I adored. The answer to my distressed question came quickly, and calmed my nervous system like a warm shower on a freezing cold day. This being doesn’t belong to you. Although her physical body is small, her soul is vast, mature and capable of making perfect decisions for this lifetime. Your job is to simply love her, so she may freely teach you, and learn whatever she desires. You cannot harm this child. Her soul is powerful beyond anything you could imagine.

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As we reach outside of our limited perception of the universe we recognize, almost immediately, that fear remains a constant, regardless of ones circumstances. The good news is that if you can identify fearful thoughts and instead of letting them possess your every move, you can use them to guide you in a new and exciting direction.